Education

Your source for youth perspectives on trends, policies and innovation in education.

Photo Credit: Lissa Soep

The Science Of Hypnosis

Hypnosis has been around for centuries. It’s been proven to reduce stress, anxiety and pain. Yet the practice is still struggling for mainstream public acceptance. New research from Stanford University is applying the latest medical imaging tools to figure out the science behind hypnosis, and what makes it work. Youth Radio’s Chantell Williams wanted to know what hypnosis can do for stressed out teens.

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(Photo Credit: Sophie Asia)

Photovoice Exhibit: Scenes And Stories From Young Women

Ten women from Alameda County were given cameras to document their lives in low-income communities. Their photographs went on display this Monday at the California Endowment as part of a project called, “How We See It.”

The project focuses on how poverty affects one’s health. And the method for exploring this issue is a research method called Photovoice, where participants take photographs of their community and develop narratives to accompany the photos. They discuss them as a group, and then craft outreach or action plans.

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High Tech Carnival Gets Kids Interested In Science And Math

Anyone ever wonder what a carnival in the year 2020 would be like? Probably lots of cool technology, games and huge robots.

Well, we won’t have to wait until 2020 to find out. Inventors Brent Bushnell and Eric Gradman will be launching the Two Bit Circus, a revamped version of the classic carnival, next spring in Los Angeles and San Francisco. I spoke with the inventors and learned more about their new and improved version of the carnival.

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New Guidelines: Keeping Track Of Teen Suicide Attempts

This week, clinicians, researchers, insurers and patients have a new handbook for diagnosing mental disorders. The DSM-5 (the fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) contains changes that will affect young people specifically, including new guidelines on how to measure and document suicidal behavior in adolescents.

Dr. David Shaffer, Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at Columbia University, worked on this section of the new manual, and he gave us a little background.

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