Tech

Your source for youth perspectives on the culture of technology, digital media, and the arts.

The Virtual Reality Dreams Of The 90’s Are Alive At E3

The last time most video game players were excited about virtual reality was the 1990s. Before internet browsers were commonplace and game consoles were still actively marketed by the number of bits they could process, virtual reality held out the shimmering promise of the cyberspace envisioned by science fiction authors like William Gibson: the future was going to be accessed by way of immersive technology that would project digital avatars of ourselves into detailed virtual worlds.

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Covering Pop Hits On YouTube Is Starting To Pay

The online video sharing site YouTube is this generation’s MTV. Artists like Gotye and Psy have found mainstream success when their videos go viral. Yet the site is dominated by amateurs covering other people’s songs – from toddlers chirping The Beatles to teens tackling Led Zeppelin.

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(Photo Credit: Benjamin Chun)

Cheating In The Digital Age

My parents always tell me that when it comes to school, I have it a lot easier than they did. When they entered college in the 80s, the encyclopedia was still the go-to source for academic information, and your only tools in the classroom were a notebook, pen, and an open mind. This, to me, is unimaginable. Today’s educational technology makes it a lot easier to learn, and a lot easier to cut corners.

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Photo Credit: Ike Sriskandarajah

How Young People are Really Using Snapchat

Want to know what kind of pictures young people are really sharing on Snapchat? Just ask them.

A couple months ago, my friend told me about a new photo sharing app called Snapchat. I downloaded it, added my friend, and soon I got a notification that I had received my first Snapchat. I opened it up, and saw my friend, Shae, giving me the McKayla Maroney “not impressed” look. Then the photo vanished.

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Digital DJing Looks Good On Paper – And It Works

Kate Stone has advanced some futuristic technology, turning simple construction paper into turntables that actually play music.

Youth Radio and Turnstyle had the honor of hosting this inventor who wants to change the way we think about electronics. It’s awe-inspiring to watch Stone’s as-yet-unnamed creation in action: you touch your simulated turntables on a piece of paper, and you’re controlling the DJ app on the iPad sitting five feet away from you. Every function that’s available on an analog turntable, including blending songs and scratching records, is also possible with Stone’s technology.

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Drones, Drones Everywhere… Including Youth Radio

I met my first drone playing Call Of Duty: Black Ops. In the game, you can control one of these unmanned flying vehicles to hover and fire missiles to destroy enemy territory. In real life we also associate drones with death from above. The news constantly reminds us of their destructive power, but at a recent Brains and Beakers, Youth Radio’s science-speaker series, Chris Anderson demonstrated how drones can be constructive too.

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